why organic sheets…
are they worth it?

Ask most people why they buy organic produce and they might tell you it tastes better, or that it’s healthier for their families, or maybe that it’s better for the planet. The higher prices that organic produce can command is worth it. Ask them if they buy organic bedding, and most will say no, they’re too expensive.

When it comes to bedding, thread count isn’t the only predictor of quality. High thread count does mean a smoother feel, and usually a better quality sheet. But what really matters is what goes into that thread to begin with—high-quality fibers make better bedding, even if the thread count isn’t as high. That alone is one reason to make the switch to organic bedding—you’re starting with higher quality fiber.

Cotton may conjure up images of green fields and white puffy clouds that look like pure cotton balls, but the truth is, traditionally-grown cotton is one of the most heavily sprayed crops there is. Conventional cotton farming is bad for the soil, the air, ground water, and beneficial bugs and birds.

Organic cotton had been grown, harvested, processed, and manufactured without the harmful chemicals, resulting in a lower carbon footprint, and significantly less negative impact. Growing organic does take more time, and for now, costs more. But the results are worth it—the process hasn’t damaged the earth, and you’re sleeping in bedding that is free of harmful chemicals.

As more consumers make the switch to organic textiles, the demand will increase. Eventually, the price will go down as organic becomes the standard instead of the exception.

Want to make the switch? Do it in steps. The next time you need to purchase bedding or towels, choose an organic option instead. Keep doing that each time you need to buy a new towel, or sheet set. It’s easy, and it feels good. Start with just one set of organic cotton sheets, and see how good they can look and feel; you’ll be convinced.

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embracing nature… an organic approach

We love the natural, organic appeal of bringing a little of nature indoors. We love the blurring of the lines, the unique aesthetic, and the sense of beauty and harmony it creates. You don’t have to create an indoor oasis, even the smallest touches can help bring the beauty nature into your interiors. It can be as simple as organic bedding, adding a bubbling fountain to your home office, or displaying a few river stones in a glass hurricane. The trick is to bring a bit of nature into every space of your home, and to embrace it. Continue reading

fall blanket round up…
cozying up

fall blanket

There are some things that just go together – wine and cheese, chocolate and port, fall and blankets. As days turn cooler and nights get crisp, we naturally reach for cozy blankets and throws to ward off the chill. Sometimes all that’s needed is something light and soft, other times only the thickest, warmest of blankets will do. Outside or in, a cozy throw is comfortable, a little shot of nostalgia, and stylish as well. How to choose a fall blanket? We’ve got you covered. Continue reading

summer sleep…
making your bed for a cool night

Spring_Air_Bedding_Collection

Summertime and the livin’ is… warm. By the time July rolls around, most of us have swapped out our winter bedding in favor of lighter covers. Sure, that could be as simple as putting away the heavy duvet and wool blankets, but we still want our summer bedding to feel as rich and luxurious as it did all winter long. We just want it to be cooler.

Take the chance to do a little summer swap. Pack up the dark colors and heavy fabrics until cooler weather returns. Instead top your bed with a lightweight cotton or linen blanket (for the occasional chilly summer night). While you’re at it, change out to all-cotton percale or jersey sheets for a cooler night’s sleep. Continue reading

sustainable sheets…
the whats and whys

“Organic bedding” – we’ve all heard it, we’ve all seen it, and some of us have even purchased it. But have you ever wondered why? A little research quickly gets through all the marketing and buzzwords to reveal the truth.

Conventional cotton production is perhaps the dirtiest and most toxic cultivated crop. That’s a pretty strong statement, but consider: Continue reading